16 YEAR OLD GIRL MENTORING OTHER GIRLS – LAUNCHES AN “ALL GIRLS MUST GO TO SCHOOL PROJECT ”

In Nigeria, it is estimated that 23% of women aged 15-19years have begun childbearing and 32% of teenagers in rural areas have become young mothers, according to the Demographic Health Survey of 2013. One of the focal points of discussion at the just concluded family planning conference in Nigeria which took place on the 3rd – 6th of December, 2018 in Nigeria is the prevention of teenage pregnancy and promotion of adolescent reproductive health rights.

Youth and Adolescents were given the opportunity to speak up about their health needs so policymakers can put in place services to meet these needs. As part of efforts to make visible the works of young people making an impact in their communities, 5 young people shared their innovative work as it relates to reproductive health needs of adolescents and young persons. The youngest of them, to give a pitch about her work was 16 years old, Peace Ayo Adegbola. It was heartwarming seeing this young determined girl doing something to make the lives of others better.

Peace giving a pitch about her work with girls in her community.

Peace Adegbola is a role model to other adolescent girls in her community. She equips girls with life skills and information necessary to curb teenage pregnancy. She shared the story of her journey into becoming girls advocate in this interview with me.

A.A: Tell us your name

Peace: My name is Peace Ayo Adegbola

A.A: So are you a student?

Peace: Yes I’m a student. I just wrote my WAEC, waiting for admission into the university. I am a girl advocate and I’m 16 years old.

A.A: What steered you up in that direction?

Peace & Her Dad

Peace: My daddy works with Society for family health and so he goes to rural communities to educate these young girls about the importance of family planning. Sometimes he normally takes me along. When I go to these communities I find that the majority of these adolescent girls are not in school. Boys are going to school and a majority of the girls are at home. I was just 10 years old so I started asking questions, became anxious and wanted to do something about this. I felt like if a 10year old girl Like me is outspoken, I wanted other girls to be too and I decided to be an advocate. And my dad inspired me, the communities I have been to and what the girls are passing through.

A.A: That was how you started the girls club?

Peace sharing her story in a quick interview with Adebisi

Peace: The girls club actually started as a self-esteem session with the girls. I launched a project on “All Girls must go to School” which targeted girls that are not in school to ensure that these girls go to school. We have about 200 girls are now in school as a result and come this September more girls will be enrolled. I needed a sustainability plan to keep these girls in school. I found out that something so simple as self-esteem makes them drop out of school. So I created a small group where I talk to these young girls. At first, it was just the girls we were sponsoring to school.

A.A: How are you funding this sponsorship?

Peace: Strong Enough Girls are my key partners, Youth Hub Africa, and so many partners and some individuals that buy into the idea.

A.A: Going forward where do you see this? Are you intending to fully make a career of development work?

Peace: Yes! Because my partner, who happens to be my dad, and I currently jointly own an organization. It is something I want to do for life; it’s something that even though I do other things, this is one thing I will never leave. This is service to humanity and girls like me. I believe so much in their potentials.

A.A: Your advice for girls, adults and especially parents.

Peace: My advice to young girls is that there is time for everything; take it one step at a time. And if you have made some mistakes don’t use it to judge yourself or pull yourself back. The thing about making mistakes or falling down is for you to know the right way to take. My advice to parents is that they should have a close relationship with their kids and to actually open up. Tell them about sexual reproductive issues. Talk to your child about hygiene, menstrual hygiene. Do not code things and give wrong information, for example, say that “if a boy touches you, you will get pregnant, No! Tell them that it is sex that gets a girl pregnant. Prepare them so they will make the right choices.

Adolescent and youth health needs is a must attend to.

Someone mentored Peace Aydegbola right and now she, in turn, has become a mentor and role model to other girls in her community, nipping teenage pregnancy in the bud and inspiring girls to go to and finish school.

One person can make a huge difference

Adebisi Adetunji (C) Founder Beehyve Empowerment and Development Initiative. Media content provider, Trainer & consultant-@debisibusybeemedia, Behavioral Change Radio Drama, Communication4Development, Social Media Influencer, Controller Programs (FRCN) Catch me on Twitter – @DebisiBusybee, Facebook & email – bisimodupe1975@gmail.com

Pacelli School for the Blind and Partially Sighted, Nigeria

Photo Hanging on the Wall in front of the Principal’s office at Pacelli School for the Blind & Partially Sighted.

Students appear in clean and neat purple uniform, black Cortina shoes, white socks with a blue line at the tip. It is the beginning of another school session; students laughed and chatted happily with their schoolmates whom they haven’t seen for almost two months because of the long holidays. Soon they filed up in a row of two on a pavement and faced the beautiful and neatly mowed lawn. A few students stepped forward carrying drums and sticks and begin to beat it as their fellow students raised a song of praise. Voices of these visually impaired and partially sighted children flowed towards new parents waiting with their sons and daughters to be checked in for the new school term.

I listened to their beautiful voices and somewhere deep within my heart I was glad that they have the opportunity to be educated, empowered and made ready for a life of independence at Pacelli School for the blind. It was an emotional experience for me as well, as I watched newly admitted students hold onto their parents unsure of what laid ahead for them in their new school. Some of these parents wrapped their hands around their chests with mixed emotions. In their eyes and facial expression, they are relieved that finally, their wards can now get a quality education in a place that will cater to their unique need. However, they worry about leaving their children in the care of the school administration and managers. Mostly I saw hope in spite of the uncertainty of what the future holds.

Pacelli School for the blind is owned by the Catholic Archdiocese of Lagos state and it’s been run by Sisters. The 56years old school which was established on the 16th of June 1962 provides elementary school education and 1year rehabilitation services for older visually impaired or partially sighted children in secondary school. This is to equip them with coping skills in school and life.

It is a non-discriminatory school which admits children from both Muslim and Christian homes. Pacelli school for the blind and partially sighted is also a Non-paying institution that offers free education, accommodation, feeding(3 times daily), free educational materials, and school uniforms. The school is sustained by donations in kind and cash from organizations, religious institutions, individuals and parents who go the extra mile by giving and also helping to raise funds from their friends and sphere of influence.

Support a visually impaired child today by donating whatever you can to Pacelli School for the blind and partially sighted.

My team and I at Beehyve Empowerment and Development Initiative are doing our part by facilitating and sponsoring the enrollment of a visually impaired boy in the school.

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As we expand our educational support program and raise more funds we hope to donate to enabling more visually impaired children to attend Pacelli School for the blind.

There is ability in disability with an enabling environment.

Join us in helping the work at Pacelli to go on for many more years to come. You can visit the school and donate in cash and kind. If you are far away or across the world, You can call 08145710797/ 07016008848 or send fund support to First Bank, Nigeria – 2004948780 

Adebisi Adetunji (C) Founder Beehyve Empowerment and Development Initiative. Media content provider, Trainer & consultant-@debisibusybeemedia, Behavioral Change Radio Drama, Communication4Development, Social Media Influencer, Controller Programs (FRCN) Catch me on Twitter – @DebisiBusybee, Facebook & email – bisimodupe1975@gmail.com

Every Child Has a Right to Education & Quality Life

Pinterest. com

As a parent or guardian you have a duty to provide for and protect your child. Do not burden your son/daughter with your responsibility. Plan to have only the number of children you can cater for.

Every child has a right to be cared for and provided for.
Every child deserves to live in a safe environment in order to achieve his or her potential.
Every child has a right to provision of basic needs
Every child has a right to protection
Every child has a right to quality life & education. 

Say No to Child Labor

Say No to Child Abuse 

Now that Schools are in session, ensure that your child is enrolled and regularly attends school. 

Adebisi Adetunji (C) Founder Beehyve Empowerment and Development Initiative. Media content provider, Trainer & consultant-@debisibusybeemedia, Behavioral Change Radio Drama, Communication4Development, Social Media Influencer, Principal Producer (FRCN) Catch me on Twitter – @DebisiBusybee, Facebook & email – bisimodupe1975@gmail.com

She Needed A Chance to Believe Part 2

Catch up on the first part of the story: She Needed A Chance to Believe Part 1.

Alexandra is the second born of her siblings. She saw her older sister, Esther get enrolled in the university while her closest younger siblings were getting ready to also get into college. She felt left out and a bleak future stared her in the face. She badly wanted to continue her education but this WAEC mountain refuses to give way to her dreams. To challenge her father’s plan to enroll her in learning a trade was out of the question. Her father was revered and his authority was not to be challenged. He wanted so badly that his children succeeded and Alexandra’s case left him feeling like all his hard work to provide was wasted.

If only I would be allowed to attempt the exams again”, Alexandra thought to herself but even she didn’t believe that she could pass any more than her parents.

Days, weeks and months pass by and then one day her father announced that she would be sent to her grandma’s place in the village to enroll in something. Alexandra’s heart was torn in a different directions.  To her it felt like a plan to abandon her far away from home. She was not ready to leave her siblings and all that was familiar to her. Her self-esteem took a deeper downturn.

One day in the midst of all this her older sister who was in the university shared a hopeful news with Alexandra. There was an opportunity at the university where her sister was enrolled in to do certificate courses that did not require scoring up to 7credits in WAEC. Alexandra had a few passes and probably one credit, she wondered if she would be admitted to do the course. Her sister insisted that it was possible but they had one hurdle to cross, convincing their father who by then had lost hope of Alexandra getting into the university.

Her sister, Esther summoned the courage to speak with their father but the meeting took place at his office. Convincing their father was not easy as he argued that Alexandra was terribly weak in learning and so it would amount to a waste of money. Her older sister, Esther pressed harder and had to promise that she will ensure that Alexandra pays attention in school. Esther had to agree to be held responsible if Alexandra fails again.

When Alexandra got the news that her father was willing to give the certificate course in Library science a try, she was ecstatic! Her siblings celebrated this news in their room. The next step was to actually get her admitted into the course. For some reason, the university didn’t give her any hassles as she was admitted. It was a lifeline for Alexandra, she gave the course her best shot, studying so hard and getting her brilliant course mates to teach her. Many nights she will sleep in the class studying and learning as far as she was concerned she was now a university/college student. Never mind that people wondered what good could come out of such a not so “prestigious course” of the times. It wasn’t even a degree or diploma just a certificate course. Alexandra did not care she kept at it and when her one year course was over, she scored 4points, she was an A student. Alexandra wept as she looked at her result, it was unbelievable.

She never believed that she had what it takes in her to succeed as a student talk more of coming out with an A grade. Her parents and siblings celebrated this victory and all voices and ideas that said,  she wouldn’t make it through school were debunked.

Alexandra went on to study nursing, midwifery and became the only medical person in the family. None of her brilliant science-oriented siblings ended up in the medical field and there were high hopes for at least one doctor…hahaha; although there were engineers, biochemistry who ended up as bankers and more.

Well, this story is not about her siblings but about Alexandra, a girl whom many thought couldn’t make it through school and she started to believe it herself too until she faced her mountain squarely in the face. Interestingly years later Alexandra would write her WAEC and scored credits and As in science subjects that she never did while in secondary school. She wanted to make her papers in one sitting and she did it.

Believe in yourself; Believe the best of your children and others. Never give up.

This is my immediate younger sister’s story and I am the older sister who had to face my father to get her to continue her education. I look at her today and marvel at the great woman she had become. Never give up on anyone, keep believing the best.

Adebisi Adetunji (C)

Speeches & Sounds by “The Dew” – Catching them Young

I was part of a Speech and Sound competition for Students organized by Adewunmi Aluko, we call her “the Dew”. This dear friend and sister is passionate about helping young people to pronounce, speak boldly and correctly the English language. It is also aimed at boosting the self-confidence of children. For my dear friend the Dew, it is giving back to society using her skills as a speech coach, presenter and news reader. Now she wants to catch them young.

I was reminded of my vowel and consonant sounds today even as an adult. See the drama unfold as students tried to pronounce words and make sounds… Hehehe try me and you will understand that It is not easy o!
Kudos to all the participating schools and children. It was fun and intense.

Photos from the event which took place at the Institute of African Studies University of Ibadan:

American Christian Home School Students
Deril Academy School
Aunty Mary’s Head Start School.
Living Spring School
A cross section of students participating in the speeches & sound competition
Panel of Judges comprising of speech coaches & Quiz master: Earnest Odirri, Chinelo Obidike, wunmi Aluko.
Some of the school girls taking a selfie with Wunmi Aluko and me… Girl power!
Panel of judges – Stella Oyebanji, Ernest and Chinelo
We didn’t forget to take a selfie with the boys. They are very dear to our hearts too😀💓

Contact Wunmi Aluko for speech & sound training for students & teachers; for anyone or group who wishes to speak right and sound confident. 080126262814. 

Adebisi Adetunji(C)

A worrisome Protest/Trend

STUDENTS ON PROTEST
Students protesting in Oyo State

Friday the 3rd of June, 2016 was just another day and it had been a busy one at work for me. So here I was exhausted and on my way home. I carried my hand bag on one shoulder and my lap top bag with all my working tools heavily on the other shoulder. I matched down the stairs walking all the way from the third floor. Just when I stepped outside; I caught a glimpse of secondary school students marching towards my office building in a protest. This was a warning sign that something was seriously wrong…I mean I can’t remember the last time students in secondary school took to the streets in protest. So I had to wait a while to be sure it was even safe to step outside the gate even though their grievance was not targeted towards me or other people on the street.

Finally they gathered at the gate and angry chants about the  new state government policy to have a public-private ownership of some of their schools (Public schools). These children felt that their parents would not be able to afford the fees when this policy goes through. In fact many of their parents who work in the public service have not been paid their salaries for months. And rightly so in my own opinion this new policy would definitely affect the number of children of low income earners who gets the privilege of been educated.

This protest was to be the first one, as on Monday the 6th June, 2016 more students joined the protest. This time some leaders of the Nigerian Labour Congress(NLC), Oyo state chapter where in custody of the Police over an alleged disruption of a stakeholders meeting held with concerned government officials on the matter of the new policy. As far as a number of people were concerned it was simply an attempt by government to shelve their responsibility towards the people on education.

The protest became somewhat destructive as students were alleged to have attacked some government buildings. Right now Public Schools in the state have been closed down to prevent further escalation of the conflict.

It is worrisome that half the time the school year calendar timetable  of public schools are disrupted and  spent dealing with one crisis or the other between the state government and teachers or Labour Union. Pupils supposed to be in school are loafing around and getting engaged in truancy.

How did we even get here? The question is,  do we want “our children” to really get an education?  Our founding fathers left legacies that we are still all benefiting from, why can’t  we consolidate on providing something much better.

I look at many institutions that had been established over many decades,  structures of these buildings have endured the test of time over the years. Ask our generation and those that are behind to construct an institution that is meant to serve generations yet unborn and we come up with buildings that soon begin to crumble/crash.

Education is one non -negotiable legacy we must continue to give to generation after generation. It should be made affordable and accessible to all. Children should be in school and not on the streets protesting!

Which way Oyo State? Would our public schools become in-affordable to many children and their parents? It is not about what is convenient but about making the right sacrifice now so that we can have a better future.

All Children matter; no matter their level in the social strata

Adebisi Adetunji(C)

Strange Things within the Walls of a School

TEACHER IN CLASS
Teacher in an overcrowded classroom

It is a school day; teachers were having a hard time controlling the large number of students they had to teach per class. Many of the students hardly pay attention; some don’t even show up for classes. The teachers have their hands full coping with over 120 students in each class. It is a herculean task, exhausting and emotionally draining experience each day. Added to the task of educating these children are many cases of juvenile delinquencies. One of the teachers of a public school whom I would call, Mrs Terry had just finished a lesson and walked towards the staff room to take a quick break before her next class. She sat down at her table trying to catch her breath. The throbbing on her temple reminded her she was yet to take her breakfast. Underneath her desk was a food flask sitting comfortably in a small basket with a bottle of water. Mrs Terry picked up her flask and the bottle water; wiping the spoon on her skirt to clean up any likely dust that must have settled on it. The cement floor of the staff room was badly broken and only traces of it was left; the floor was very dusty and sandy. She began to munch the jollof rice she had brought from home.

Other staff members who had just finished their lessons too soon started walking into the staff room. There were murmurings and exclamations about the nonchalant attitudes of their students with many only able to communicate in the indigenous language. How was a teacher supposed to teach subjects in the English language; how would they even be able to write and pass the WAEC (West African Examinations Council) at the end of the day? Mrs Terry in between eating her food replied that the children’s daily drama was bad enough without any display from their parents. Barely had the words gone out of her mouth when a student whom I would call Deborah walked with her mother matching in behind her looking very angry. They both matched straight to Mrs Terry’s table. Other teachers exchanged that knowing amusing look; another drama of a parent defending their wards blindly was about to unfold. Deborah’s mother pointing accusing fingers at Mrs Terry demanded to know why her well behaved daughter had been labelled as being pregnant. She pounced to the left and to the right calling on the name of God and sending curses the way of the guilty teacher. Mrs Terry was not perturbed; it wasn’t the first time she would be faced with such angry parents who protected their children to a fault.

She braced up herself and faced mother and daughter squarely explaining why she suspected Deborah might be pregnant. Mummy Deborah screamed and explained in no few words about how they were a very religious family; how her daughter even led the morning prayers and Bible reading. Not only was that, she was the daughter of a pastor! Mrs Terry smiled in sympathy then Deborah was asked to lie down on a desk in other to show her mum proof that she was actually pregnant. By this they meant signs that a young girl was pregnant. It is said that some women can discern whether someone is pregnant even if it is a few days old. In the midst of questioning, Deborah confessed to being pregnant and her mum almost fainted. Deborah further revealed that a fellow school girl who was more experienced had taken her to see a Baba(Spiritualist) to hang the pregnancy. In scenarios like this the spiritualist does something to ensure that the stomach of the pregnant woman or girl doesn’t shoot out until very late in pregnancy. I don’t know how this works but I am told that these things actually do happen. This time Mummy Deborah was surely going to faint; she stood muted and shocked. Teacher’s then began to counsel her on how to best help her daughter through this.

Deborah’s story is just one case out of many school girls who get pregnant while in school. Many of them end up dropping out of school while others struggle to continue a midst the distraction of nursing a bay. Another example was a JSS2 school girl whose mother comes to the school at noon every day to request that she be released to go and breastfeed her baby at home. The circle continues as this young mother might end up dropping out of school and soon her daughter might also get pregnant while in JSS2 or 3 too. Teachers of these public/government schools(with exceptions of the bad examples) do their best in trying to mentor their students particularly the girls but not much can be achieved when they have to deal with over 120students per class. Many times also parents are not willing to collaborate with teachers in making a success of their daughter or son’s education.

There have been incidences of parents like Deborah’s mom coming to slap or beat a teacher and nobody is charged for assault. A story is told of a teacher who was actually thrown down the stairs by an angry parent. She spent months in the hospital with a broken leg and nothing was done about the guilty parent. As a result of incidences like these teachers in public schools decide to mind their business, mostly just doing the job as best as they can. They simply refuse to stick their necks out to go the extra mile. I’m told that teachers even have to make certain daring statements in order to protect themselves against student’s assault. A teacher who was posted to a notorious public school on her first day had to state categorically that she was a no nonsense woman. How did she do this? She told them that she heard that some of them had knives and guns they used to harass teachers with. She then told them that she was married to a soldier and also owned a gun which she was willing to use on anyone who dares harass her. After that declaration her job of teaching the students with their cooperation became easy. Now this might be going to the extreme but that’s her own way of protecting herself. It’s important to remember that majority of the lower class and some middle class send their children to public schools thus a large number of juvenile problems the society would have to deal with.

No wonder then the high rate of teenage pregnancies that occur in our public schools;

No wonder the many dropouts;

No wonder many young drug addicts produced by these public schools.

What then is the way forward? There should be continues forum between teachers and parents to enable them discuss their concerns; Girls and Boys should be sensitized the more about the importance of education to their future and proper behaviour in school. The bulk stops on the government’s table. Serious attention should be given to education at the primary and secondary level. Many public schools lack the necessary infrastructure to provide an enabling learning environment. Government should also protect the rights of teachers in these settings. It is not right to have to work in an environment one feels unsafe. Policies should be put in place to address these issues. What other measures should be taken in order to have girls and boys give an undivided attention to education and to make school safe for all?

Meaning of Words:

Jollof Rice – Popular Rice dish in Nigeria and other African counties- Its recipe include Tomato sauce, pepper,vegetable oil and other garnishing depending on ones choice

WAEC – West African Examinations Council (Student gets a secondary/high school certificate)

JSS – Junior Secondary School ( Junior class in secondary schools)

Adebisi Adetunji